Alexandria in the Winter

on

alex4

Hey folks, I’m back. It is usually good to take some time off and unwind in the midst of the crazy hustle and bustle of New York City. This time of year, when the holiday season dies down, the snow melts, and spring approaches, I usually like to take some time off away from New York city, and preferably travel to a warmer location.

Library alex

This article explains why visiting Alexandria, Egypt during the winter is way cooler than visiting in the summer. Being a tourist in your city can become challenging sometimes.

You want to visit the places that you miss, to see the good old friends, and to eat mama’s cooking. Nostalgia is a strong emotion I feel when I visit Alexandria, Egypt, the place where I grew up for a decade and where my parents are from.

I like to visit the old Qaitbay Castle, the beautiful blue Mediterranean sea, and to observe the lovely people in the crowded streets. I try to act as a native but sometimes the tourist side can get the best of me. Here are the reasons why I love visiting a coastal city in the winter:

1 – The weather is super nourishing and you can feel the fresh Mediterranean air: the weather during winters are 60 – 70 degrees Fahrenheit during the day while the temperature can drop a little by night. You can never replace this nice spring breeze in February in NYC.

2 – People are busy and prone to ‘hibernation’ during the winter. Although the sun is out and you could be comfortable in a t-shirt and jeans, the natives tend to dress more on the winter side. Jackets, scarves, and long-sleeved pullovers. I don’t blame them because they get hit by 90 – 100 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer. So it is natural for most people during the winter to feel cold.

3 – During the summer, the streets are filled with higher energy and stress levels than in the winter. By energy level I mean, electricity – air-conditions are used moderately, and people are not utilizing energy to extreme measures.

4 – Kids are in school and natives are more focused at work, opposed to the summer, when people are out all day until the late hours of the night.

5 – Traffic is reduced by half. Since Alexandria is considered the go-to summer spot for many cities in Egypt, sometimes it can get too crazy. Natives from Cairo and other cities located in the south, who miss out on the luxury of the blue sea, tend to drive up north and spend time in the coastal city during the months of July and August – it can get quite rowdy.

6 – The tasty homemade ice-cream never melts as fast during the winter. You can enjoy your ice cream without worrying about making a mess melting all-over your hands and sleeves.

7 – You can visit tourist locations such as the Great Library of Alexandria and the pretty Montaza beaches without feeling rushed or dehydrated, and definitely with no heat-waves.

8 – If you decide to visit Alexandria, then you could take a drive or a flight to the Red-Sea Hurghada, located south of Cairo. A marvel of beauty between the desert and the beautiful beach. You can enjoy activities such as hiking, snorkeling, diving, camping, and gazing at the stars.

The great balance is to find the perfect medium and visit a city where one is familiar with the native language, knows how to get around, but can also indulge and absorb what your city has to offer you from insights, sight-seeing and love all-around.  There are ways to become a tourist in a city you grew up in and also feel like you are at home.

I believe the key to these emotions can be expressed through mindfulness. When you observe and try not to critique or compare, and let oneself’s idea go from the familiar to the new, life can become beautiful and definitely will taste better.

People are struggling worldwide, the economy is not as great as we wish, we have problems on an international scale and existing internal problems in most cities of the world. But our job as global citizens is to enjoy what we have for the present time and to learn how to embrace the beauty in the middle of it all.   

alex

sidibishr-1

Advertisements

2 Comments Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s